A little while ago, Ray decided he was going on a diet.  He was not happy with his body and decided to change it.  I jumped at the chance for two reasons:

1.)  I’m a firm believer that all you have is your health.  Money, people, and things come and go, but your health sticks with your forever and decides your future more than anything else.

2.)  I like the challenge of making tasty meals that are both healthy and something he will still eat, because he’s a picky eater.

My first step in overhauling our diet was to cut out red meat.  Not entirely, because even I, little miss former vegetarian, enjoys a good medium-rare steak now and then.  But in our everyday diet, I say our red meat consumption has gone down around 80%.  I substituted ground turkey for ground beef and it does just fine.  We primarily eat chicken, pork, and fish.

The second step is to get rid of excess sugars and snacks.  No more cookies.  No more pop (even if I really miss Coca Cola).  This wasn’t so hard.

The next step is cutting corners.  You don’t have to solely eat skinny salads and drink ice water to lose weight.  Little changes and substitutions can make a world of good, though that’s not to say it should be your only plan of attack.  Using 98% fat-free canned soups (as I am prone to using in the Winter), using less or no butter, even cutting out a single egg yolk (while leaving the white) in an omelette can make a difference.

The last step is more vegetables. They are so much better for you and the amount most American’s eat is disappointing.  I find them immensely delicious and preferable to meat.  Ray does not quite agree.  This one was a touch tougher.  Ray likes veggies, but the list of veggies he likes is a shorter one.  Sending veggies in his lunch was not well received, so we went and picked up a case of V8 in individual cans up at Sam’s Club.  Two servings of veggies in each can.  Plus it’s tasty.  The only sad part is Ray insisted they be for lunches alone, and not to be enjoyed in the house.

I’ve been thinking of other ways to rebuild our diet, and my mind sprung to a more Asian-styled diet.  It’s no secret I love traditional Japanese (and Chinese) cuisine.  They are often complex meals with lean protein and lots of vegetables.  Ideal for many people watching their waistline.  The drawback is the sodium.  Ray is also watching his sodium intake for medical reasons so I have to keep that in mind too.

I gravitate towards the Japanese-styled diet because the health benefits are apparent.  The Japanese are some of the most long-lived people of the world, and their culture places emphasis on fresh ingredients and seasonal dishes.  The food is visually appealing with plenty of umami.   It is delicious and good for you, holistically speaking.  In the spirit of the theme, I want to cook more fish and use less boxed ingredients when making my meals.

My work has paid off, and Ray lost ten pounds, which he was pleased about.  It emboldens me and makes me think of how to shape up favorites so that they are healthier.  My next big project is gumbo.  I love gumbo, especially after having some at my friend Rochelle’s house in Virginia, courtesy of her step-dad.  Yet gumbo is laden with calories and salt.  I need to make it so that it is both delicious but waist-conscious.  It can be done.  I know it and I will find a way.  I will post pictures of the results, along with a rough nutritional estimate.

So expect tasty but trimmer recipes in the future!

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